Fit Recovery

Home » 2012 » June » 22

Daily Archives: June 22, 2012

Advertisements

More On Overheating

I went out for a decent, before lunch ride today and killed it…and I could have been faster.  I started out fairly slow because I was a little tight from my run last night.  It’ll never cease to amaze me how much more slow runs hurt than fast runs (to a degree of course).  That said, I started out slow with a 15 mph first mile.  I started loosening up in the second and after the third I’d abandoned my plans for an easy ride and was on it.  I blew 3:20 seconds in the first three miles and finished about 3:30 under a 20 mph pace…  To simplify the math, my first three miles were at about a 15 mph pace, my last 25.5 were just under 20 mph (19.9) with stops.

My problems the other day were with the heat, and partially the wind.  We had a 5 mph breeze in lieu of an 18 mph wind and  today I had no problem holding 20 mph into the wind – but the big difference was that the temp was down about 23 degrees (72, down from 95) too and that’s what made the difference.  I kind of got the idea that I wasn’t overtraining right after I finished my ride Wednesday.  I was sweating to beat the band by the time I dismounted and the kids wanted to go swimming so I quickly changed into my suit, chugged a cold Gatorade – that’s when I realized I was cold and had been since I’d gotten off of the bike (it wasn’t just the cold Gatorade).  The cold feeling didn’t subside for another 15 minutes and I actually had to wait a few before I got in the pool…  I was close to heat exhaustion.  This really didn’t click till yesterday evening.  Oops.

I made a few mistakes when the temps started climbing.  For one, I didn’t acclimate – I just jumped in with both feet cranking as the temps jumped from the mid 80’s to the mid 90’s – and there’s a big difference in that ten degrees.  Instead of hitting it hard on Monday and Tuesday, it would have been wiser to ease into it – maybe a 16 mph ride on Monday and 17-18 mph on Tuesday, that would have gotten me a little better accustomed to the heat.

Either way, no harm, no foul – so I looked up some tips to staying cool when the heat’s cranking.  The neatest tip was this:

“Wrapping a water-soaked bandana around your neck can do wonders to keep you cool. For maximum relief, you can go a step farther and do what a guy I know does. He folded a bandana in half and stitched up two of the sides, leaving the third open. He’ll shove that thing full of ice cubes and wrap it around his neck. Talk about an intense and lasting chill. And as the ice melts, the frigid water drips down your back and chest. Plus, that ice supply can be replentished as necessary, giving you a freeze that’ll last all day.”

There’s another long list here (scroll down to the comments section).  Most are common sense, but there are some winners in there:  “…at the first signs of heat exhaustion: back off! Greatly relax your pace at the very least and start sucking down the water like there’s no tomorrow, even (especially!) if the thought of drinking turns your off. If you’re healthy and in good shape, ten to twenty minutes at a walking pace while drinking lots of water should be enough to recover enough to get you back to a relaxed pace that’ll let you finish the ride. But if it doesn’t get better, IMMEDIATELY find air conditioning, or at least shade. And be prepared to call 911.”

Lesson learned – being a noob at cycling is so much fun

Advertisements

Does A Slow 5k Still Count As A Day Off?

Well I was all set to take a day off yesterday – I had my bike on the rack in the driveway for a thorough cleaning by 5 pm.  My wife informed me that she wouldn’t be running that evening because she just wasn’t up to it, so I ran…  But it was really slow, I promise!  9:40/9:34/9:04…well, except for that last 100 meters that I sprinted.

Ah well, it was kind of nice to get out and run.  I learned that I’d missed it a bit.

The bike is immaculate again – and ready to go for later today…

Stravacide, AKA Death Due To Stupid – In Depth…

I read of a compelling story on Bike Noob about a 41-year-old man who was trying to retake a speed record for a hill in San Francisco that he had held for a week and then lost. The parents of the man are suing Strava for: Wage loss, loss of property, hospital and medical expenses, general damage, property damage, loss of earning capacity and “other”, INTEREST AND COSTS OF SUIT.

The Bike Noob took a more politically correct stance on the case than I will when he wrote, “Hey, I just report the facts. I’ll let you figure out whether the plaintiffs have a leg to stand on, or if this suit will be thrown out of court as frivolous”.

The suit filed by the attorney representing the parents of William (Kim) Flint Jr states that, “In attempting to regain his title, Kim Flint Jr. came in contact with an automobile and was killed”.

Well anyone who knows anything about law suits can see that statement and know that Kim ran into the car, that much is obvious, so I looked into the accident a little bit. Sure enough, the speed limit on the road he was travelling on was 30 mph, he was in the neighborhood of 50 (during his previous attempt he’d hit 49.3 mph). Better still, according to one report the area close to where the accident occurred, there happens to be a park where, “There are families and pets hanging out in picnic spots along the road. They can wander into a bicyclist’s path unexpectedly. In addition, cars pull in and out of those spots”.

So anyone who is not selfish and self-centered would understand that travelling at 50 mph on this road is not wise – unless one were to contact a local bike group and get the road closed for a descent race. Call me crazy, I’m just freewheeling here. In fact, in that same account, one regular rider of the hill stated this, “I will admit I went more than 50 mph on South Park and it was really stupid and I won’t do it again.”

So here’s how the accident unfolded, as I alluded to earlier, it was Flint’s fault, “Flint, 40, of Oakland, was killed around 2 pm on June 19 when he broadsided an SUV, according to Lt. Dave Dubowy of the East Bay Regional Park District police. Flint was going downhill, in a northbound direction, when his bike traveled into the southbound lane and hit the left side of the car, said Dubowy. Flint had been going around a curve when his bike crossed over.” Here’s another account, “William Flint II was riding downhill on South Park Drive near the Grizzly picnic area at about 2 p.m. when his bicycle drifted into oncoming traffic, police said. He crashed into the side of a 2003 Ford Expedition sport utility vehicle.”

So that about clears up “came into contact with an automobile”. The truth of the matter is Flint was travelling too fast for conditions because it seems that one can infer that his speed required he cut the apex of a corner by crossing a double yellow line and ran into a truck.

Now here’s the part that really pisses me off, and I copied it directly from the .pdf of the lawsuit:

I mentioned the other day that I have a love/hate relationship with politics. This applies to lawsuits as well, and this is one I hate. So let’s pull the pretty language out and make that statement look right: The suit claims that Strava owed Flint a statement to use a degree of care that a reasonable (because Flint was obviously not operating his bicycle in a reasonable fashion, he t-boned an SUV and killed himself) person would have used, to protect their users. I’m sorry, but don’t f@ckin’ die in an attempt to break a speed challenge is implied simply in the use of GPS tracking software – the idea is to live to look at the data after the ride.

It gets even better. Kim Flint Jr. justifiably relied on Strava to host a safe challenge? What an idiotically disgusting misuse of the English language. Under this precedent, if I were to collapse and die from heat exhaustion, while tracking a ride or run and competing in a calorie burning challenge, my tracking software could be deemed responsible for motivating me to exercise. I don’t think so. It’s Kim Flint Jr.’s fault that he failed to operate his bicycle in a safe manner – in fact, if I were the driver of the Expedition that this asshole crashed into, after seeing this suit, I’d sue Kim’s parents for having to try to keep that dumb ass alive until paramedics got there and for the mental anguish caused by the dope crashing his bicycle into his SUV – Oh you bet I would. Two wrongs may not make a right, but one wrong doesn’t make a right either.

Finally, as if to put a f@ck you cherry on top, how are Flint’s parents in line to collect damages related to Kim’s loss of wages and earning capacity? What a bunch of money-grubbing bitches, starting with the attorneys right down to his parents. The man was single with no kids… The line stops when Kim’s mushed face stopped pumping air. Period.

Now here’s how BgddyJim handles this case if he’s the Judge: Dismiss the charges against Strava and stick the parents with the bill for Strava’s legal fees plus $24,998 for the aggravation of having to deal with the baseless suit in the first place.

Here’s my evidence: Flint’s father made the following statement, “Strava provides the means motivation [sic] and resources for encouraging bicyclists to race down dangerous streets in populated areas” and his lawyer stated, “They cannot dare people to do reckless things”. Strava doesn’t dare people to do reckless things. Forgive me for calling bullshit. Ignorant, self-centered egomaniacs with inferiority complexes take a stupid internet challenge and do reckless things to win them – for nothing other than the ability to pat oneself on the back. In addition, Strava does not provide the means. Last I heard, no internet based tracking software company has provided anyone a bike and a GPS enabled smart phone to use their free site – and even if they had, which would be an incredibly stupid business decision, only those people who were provided the bike, smart phone and the money to pay the phone bill would be entitled to say that they provide the means and resources for cyclists to race down dangerous streets in populated areas – without stating the obvious in the first place, lest we all flush down the worm-hole, the fact that Kim Flint Jr. was a licensed driver of an automobile (Doh!). In fact, I’d take that one step further and require the plaintiffs prove those two statements – end of suit.

So now we’ll all be inundated with ridiculous warnings about not being stupid with our bikes… No shit Sherlock.

Stravacide, AKA Death Due To Stupid – In Depth…

I read of a compelling story on Bike Noob about a 41-year-old man who was trying to retake a speed record for a hill in San Francisco that he had held for a week and then lost.  The parents of the man are suing Strava for:   Wage loss, loss of property, hospital and medical expenses, general damage, property damage, loss of earning capacity and “other”, INTEREST AND COSTS OF SUIT.

The Bike Noob took a more politically correct stance on the case than I will when he wrote,  “Hey, I just report the facts. I’ll let you figure out whether the plaintiffs have a leg to stand on, or if this suit will be thrown out of court as frivolous”.

The suit filed by the attorney representing the parents of William (Kim) Flint Jr states that, “In attempting to regain his title, Kim Flint Jr. came in contact with an automobile and was killed”.

Well anyone who knows anything about law suits can see that statement and know that Kim ran into the car, that much is obvious, so I looked into the accident a little bit.  Sure enough, the speed limit on the road he was travelling on was 30 mph, he was in the neighborhood of 50 (during his previous attempt he’d hit 49.3 mph).  Better still, according to one report the area close to where the accident occurred, there happens to be a park where, “There are families and pets hanging out in picnic spots along the road. They can wander into a bicyclist’s path unexpectedly. In addition, cars pull in and out of those spots”.

So anyone who is not selfish and self-centered would understand that travelling at 50 mph on this road is not wise – unless one were to contact a local bike group and get the road closed for a descent race.  Call me crazy, I’m just freewheeling here.  In fact, in that same account, one regular rider of the hill stated this, “I will admit I went more than 50 mph on South Park and it was really stupid and I won’t do it again.”

So here’s how the accident unfolded, as I alluded to earlier, it was Flint’s fault, “Flint, 40, of Oakland, was killed around 2 pm on June 19 when he broadsided an SUV, according to Lt. Dave Dubowy of the East Bay Regional Park District police. Flint was going downhill, in a northbound direction, when his bike traveled into the southbound lane and hit the left side of the car, said Dubowy. Flint had been going around a curve when his bike crossed over.”  Here’s another account, “William Flint II was riding downhill on South Park Drive near the Grizzly picnic area at about 2 p.m. when his bicycle drifted into oncoming traffic, police said.  He crashed into the side of a 2003 Ford Expedition sport utility vehicle.”

So that about clears up “came into contact with an automobile”.  The truth of the matter is Flint was travelling too fast for conditions because it seems that one can infer that his speed required he cut the apex of a corner by crossing a double yellow line and ran into a truck.

Now here’s the part that really pisses me off, and I copied it directly from the .pdf of the lawsuit:

I mentioned the other day that I have a love/hate relationship with politics.  This applies to lawsuits as well, and this is one I hate.  So let’s pull the pretty language out and make that statement look right:  The suit claims that Strava owed Flint a statement to use a degree of care that a reasonable (because Flint was obviously not operating his bicycle in a reasonable fashion, he t-boned an SUV and killed himself) person would have used, to protect their users.  I’m sorry, but don’t f@ckin’ die in an attempt to break a speed challenge is implied simply in the use of GPS tracking software – the idea is to live to look at the data after the ride.

It gets even better.  Kim Flint Jr. justifiably relied on Strava to host a safe challenge?  What an idiotically disgusting misuse of the English language.  Under this precedent, if I were to collapse and die from heat exhaustion, while tracking a ride or run and competing in a calorie burning challenge, my tracking software could be deemed responsible for motivating me to exercise.  I don’t think so.  It’s Kim Flint Jr.’s fault that he failed to operate his bicycle in a safe manner – in fact, if I were the driver of the Expedition that this asshole crashed into, after seeing this suit, I’d sue Kim’s parents for having to try to keep that dumb ass alive until paramedics got there and for the mental anguish caused by the dope crashing his bicycle into his SUV – Oh you bet I would.  Two wrongs may not make a right, but one wrong doesn’t make a right either.

Finally, as if to put a f@ck you cherry on top, how are Flint’s parents in line to collect damages related to Kim’s loss of wages and earning capacity?  What a bunch of money-grubbing bitches, starting with the attorneys right down to his parents.  The man was single with no kids…  The line stops when Kim’s mushed face stopped pumping air.  Period.

Now here’s how BgddyJim handles this case if he’s the Judge:  Dismiss the charges against Strava and stick the parents with the bill for Strava’s legal fees plus $24,998 for the aggravation of having to deal with the baseless suit in the first place.

Here’s my evidence:  Flint’s father made the following statement, “Strava provides the means motivation [sic] and resources for encouraging bicyclists to race down dangerous streets in populated areas” and his lawyer stated, “They cannot dare people to do reckless things”.  Strava doesn’t dare people to do reckless things.  Forgive me for calling bullshit.  Ignorant, self-centered egomaniacs with inferiority complexes take a stupid internet challenge and do reckless things to win them – for nothing other than the ability to pat oneself on the back.  In addition, Strava does not provide the means.  Last I heard, no internet based tracking software company has provided anyone a bike and a GPS enabled smart phone to use their free site – and even if they had, which would be an incredibly stupid business decision, only those people who were provided the bike, smart phone and the money to pay the phone bill would be entitled to say that they provide the means and resources for cyclists to race down dangerous streets in populated areas – without stating the obvious in the first place, lest we all flush down the worm-hole, the fact that Kim Flint Jr. was a licensed driver of an automobile (Doh!).  In fact, I’d take that one step further and require the plaintiffs prove those two statements – end of suit.

So now we’ll all be inundated with ridiculous warnings about not being stupid with our bikes…  No shit Sherlock.