Fit Recovery

Home » 2012 » November » 07

Daily Archives: November 7, 2012

Advertisements

Here we go Elisa… ūüėČ

Advertisements

5,000 Miles Came And Went…

No fanfare, no ticker tape parade (that was tongue in cheek, of course there wasn’t a ticker tape parade) – I didn’t even roll past 5,000 miles outside – I did it on my trainer in my office watching Knight and Day, doing 2 minutes on 1 minute off intervals till I came close to puking – then I switched to 1 minute on 4 minutes off.¬† I cooled down for the last two minutes and was done.¬† I wish, of course, that I could have done more, but truth be told I just couldn’t fit anymore in.¬† Not enough time in the year.¬† But that’s a good thing.

UPDATE:

What timing!¬† I just looked at my event widget on my side bar – rest starts today!¬† Perfect.¬† Unfortunately I still have plenty of wood to get split up and a bunch of work to do around the house.¬† So much for rest.¬† Maybe I’ll just save that for when I die.¬† Yeah, that sounds more like it.

Can You Do A Pull Up?

I bumped into an article on Bicycling Magazine that made me chuckle a bit… It’s written by a woman who goes by the nickname “Fit Chick”, and ponders the question of whether or not women are athletes based on if they can do a pull up or not.¬† Her article was¬†fed off of¬†a New York Times article that explains why women “can’t” do pull ups.

I really don’t know what the big freaking deal is. Who, honestly, cares whether or not¬†a woman¬†can do pull a pull up?

Going back to the¬†question in the Bicycling Magazine, if a woman can’t do a pull up, is she an athlete?¬† Let me go on record as saying that I find the question having to ask the question in the first place utterly absurd on its face anyway, but¬†let’s check with Webster’s for the¬†definition of the word athlete:¬† “a person who is trained or skilled in exercises, sports, or games requiring physical strength, agility, or stamina“.¬† Well, there’s no mention of pull ups there.¬† In fact, I checked at least a half-dozen other online dictionaries and none of them made mention of pull ups.

Now far be it from me to criticize, but let’s look at this from another angle…¬† When’s the last time you’ve ever heard anyone wonder aloud or in print, whether or not a guy¬†should be considered an athlete if he doesn’t partake in yoga?¬† Even the yoga guys out there would say that the question itself is preposterous.¬† Therefor, the question of whether or not a woman should be considered an athlete if she can’t do a couple of pull ups is equally silly.

In the end, especially in the sports we fitties take part in, running, cycling, mountain biking and swimming, it doesn’t matter whether you can do a pull up or not – in short, I agree with “Fit Chick”. ¬† In those sports it’s all about the legs, core and shoulders (upper body) strength. You need all three in all three sports, but none of those sports is dependent on the ability to pull oneself up on a bar, so whether a woman can do one or not will have no bearing on her ability to run, cycle or swim.

I do have a better¬†idea as to why these silly¬†topics are raised on a regular basis in the first place.¬† In the end, once you boil the bullshit down, it’s all about keeping everyone sufficiently angry and divided.¬† I can guarantee you it’s not about equality – everyone knows that women are enrolling in and graduating from college in greater numbers than men are but do you see programs to balance out that inequity?¬† Of course not.¬† So please, next time you see one of those silly¬†“men can do this, but women can’t” articles, do the world a favor and choose peace and serenity over anger:¬† Move along.¬† If you don’t, if you choose to¬†fall into the competition trap, you’ve allowed the haters to get you to hate, it’s as simple¬†as that.

UPDATE:  The author of the Bicycling Magazine article posted a comment about my take on the New York Times Article but misunderstood to whom I directed my consternation.  To make this crystal clear, I agree with the nature of the Bicycling Magazine article Рmy comment about the topic being raised and silly in the first place was directed at the New York Times Article.